For a Similar State-by-State Outline of Presidential Ballot Access click here.

Colorado

In 2019, Colorado erected higher barriers to forming new political parties in the state, still allowing third party candidates to achieve official recognition for their organization from the state by petitioning onto the General Election ballot, but raising the statewide signature requirements from 1,000 total to 1,000 per each of the state’s seven Congressional Districts. Similarly, petition signature requirements for US Representative (petitioning onto the ballot as a US Representative is another road to official party recognition in Colorado) went from 800 to 1,500.

Minor political parties can still achieve more immediate recognition from Colorado by accruing 10,000 petition signatures as a party.

Florida

To be recognized as a minor party in Florida, a group consisting of more than one person must file a certificate and copies of the minor party’s constitution, bylaws, regulations, and rules with the Florida Division of Elections.

Utah

A party in Utah may gather 2,000 voter signatures by the December before the next election year to gain official recognition in time for that election, and thereafter at least one of its candidates must win at least 2% of the US House vote for the entire state (22,284 votes in the 2016 election cycle) in order for the party to maintain its status.

Sources:

  1. https://www.sos.state.co.us/pubs/elections/Candidates/FAQs/QPOandMinorParty.html
  2. https://ballotpedia.org/Ballot_access_requirements_for_political_parties_in_Florida#Political_parties
  3. https://elections.utah.gov/register/register-as-a-new-political-party
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